Bathroom Cleaning and Maintenance Tips

Next to kitchens, bathrooms rank number two as the most used and abused room in any home. From your toilet to your sink to your tile floor, the components of your bathroom take a daily beating. Though bathroom maintenance begins with cleaning and trying to maintain a dry environment, the act of maintenance goes beyond scrubbing your bathtub or dropping one of those blue things in your toilet. Maintenance also includes caulking, re-grouting, and dusting to keep the room sanitary.

  • Cleaning Your Shower: The act of showering eventually destroys any bathroom. Because the shower head is essentially spraying water all over your bathroom walls, shower curtain, and ceiling, there are a few things you want to do to keep this area mold free. First, keep the area dry. Try and wipe down the walls after every use. If you get lazy or there are some hard to manage areas in the confined shower space, you may see some mold pop up so keep your eye out for any mold (especially black mold or white film). If caught early and scrubbed with an abrasive cleaner, the mold can be mostly alleviated. Mold can quickly build up on a shower curtain because of the folds of the material and on a shower door because of the tracks and the places that inevitably pool water. In the case of your curtain, if it molds up you can spray it with a cleaner containing bleach or just replace the liner. For your shower door, you can easily take it off the track regularly (every few weeks) and check it for any mold or water.
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  • Toilets: You should clean your toilet ever week or bi weekly depending on the amount of “traffic” the toilet is receiving. The longer you wait to clean your toilet, the harder and more arduous the task will be of getting it back to par. In addition to regular cleaning, you should always be aware of any leaks in your toilet, especially around the basin. If you do detect leaks, there is a chance that the wax seal is broken. Either attempt to check the toilet for leaks yourself (fairly easy process) or just call a plumber.
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  • Bathroom Sinks: Think of everything your bathroom sink manages. Your sink is usually the receptacle for hair, spit, soap, shaving cream, and toothpaste. The bathroom sink should at least be cleaned every day. Be observant of any water leaking from your trap and pipes.
  • Bathroom Floors: Your bathroom floors are dirty. All of the hair, dust, fuzz from your towels, toothpaste what never made it into the sink, urine, and other gems. I forgot to mention your bathroom carpet. Even though the high pile of most bathroom rugs are effective in hiding dirt, it’s there. Bathroom carpets should be vacuumed regularly and washed at least every month.
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  • Re-Grouting: If you have a tile bathroom, always be aware of any cracks in the grout. This can be a result of bad tile installation, incorrect water to grout ratio, or just the age of the grout itself. If you do have any holes or cracks, you can fill them by applying more grout to the area. It’s always a good idea to keep your grout color written down somewhere as well in case you do need to grout, you won’t be guessing if you used “bone” or “ivory”.
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  • Caulking: Caulk is typically laid around your bathtub where the tile meets the tub. Caulk can become easily moldy and even separate from the tile or the tub. Unfortunately, caulk is not as friendly as grout and you should not caulk over old caulk. Scrape off any old caulk once a year and reapply it.

Cleaning your bathroom is also maintaining your bathroom. By making sure your seams are caulked, your bathroom stays dry, and your bathroom stays clean, it can increase the longevity of any home improvement work you have done.

This guest blog has been provided by Nicolas DAlleva. Nicolas is the owner of Specialty Answering Service, a live answering service for businesses throughout North America. For contractors, Specialty offers voicemail services in addition to a live operator service to help capture leads.

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